Miya Ando

Miya Ando is a descendant of Bizen sword makers and spent her childhood among Buddhist priests. She combines traditional Japanese techniques with modern ones transforming sheets of metal into abstract paintings suffused with color. Ando applied heat, sandpaper, grinders and acid to the metal canvases to produce the light-reflecting gradients. Her Hamon paintings refers to the ancient sword-smithing Japanese technique of the repetitive process of quenching and tempering a forged blade that creates a cloud-like pattern along the edge of the sword. 

Featured image: 

Indigo Line, 2015. Pigment and urethane on aluminum. Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York. 

Beni Crimson, 2016. Pigment and urethane and resin on aluminum. Ukigumo Gray Gold Mandala, 2016. Pigment, dye and urethane on stainless steel. Ukigumo Gold Green Mandala, 2016. Pigment, dye and urethane on stainless steel.
Hakkanai Gray Purple Olive, 2016. Pigment and urethane and resin on aluminum.
Hamon Polyptych, 2016 urethane on aluminum.
Hamon 2.4.2, 2015. Pigment and urethane and resin on aluminum.

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